Monday, June 14, 2021

Gathering the artwork

Now that the rain is over, the garden is established and the 90+ degree days have arrived, I am finding time to do the necessary things to get this house decorated. It's only been 10 months since we moved in, but with the advent of new furniture and a complete decorating reboot, I know what needs to be hung on these huge blank walls. 

This is Bosna #2, 69x78"Hand dyed and commercial cottons, machine pieced and machine quilted, and has never been hung because the rod pocket has yet to be sewn down. This will be my task for today. I have an electical conduit pipe all ready to cut to size and hopefully with Dave's help I'll be able to hoist it up high enough to look appropriate. I am using Command hooks, as I have a big distaste for nail holes in my walls. I don't think I have ever tried to hang a quilt this large in that manner, so we'll just have to have faith that it can be done.


Lots of much smaller work has been unpacked and I have grouped them by color. Good news for me, I just found out my BFF Patsy had a decorating company in the 90's, and she'll be supervising me, I need help.




3 comments:

  1. Hey Melody,
    Those command hooks can be quite entertaining.. We just had one fall along with the picture it was holding. It took it over five years. :)
    maggie

    ReplyDelete
  2. The command hooks are fine for light stuff but I wouldn't hang a large quilt with them. I had some framed artwork come down (no damage thankfully) and the hook tore some of the drywall off with it when it came down. And the hooks were rated for twice what the picture weighed. Not even a big picture.

    I also hate nails for hanging anything. I always used picture hooks for art but not quilts. I watched a TV decorating show in horror as the host used a staple gun to staple a quilt to a wall.

    I have a huge quilt hanging in my dining room. I hate the quilt rod/brackets and clamps that are normally used for quilts. the brackets cover up too much of the quilt and no amount of paint can make the brackets attractive. I bought a really long curtain rod and two finials. Then I bought two large wooden rings with an eye-hook on them. I attached them to chains and put hooks in my ceiling. It's like hanging a curtain only "upside down." I threaded the quilt on the rod, then one ring on each end, then the finial to keep it all on. Then I hung the chain from the ceiling hooks. I can vary the length of the chain depending on the size of the quilts so they are always centered on the wall. I have one where I shorten it up to a few loops of chain from the ceiling hook, a small quilt where I let the chain out about 18 inches (I have tall ceilings). The rod is decorative so I don't mind it showing on both ends. This way any size quilt I hang can be centered. I have some small spotlight track lighting on the ceiling so I don't have to keep adjusting the lights. I just hang the quilts in the center of the wall and they are spotlighted. It also makes it really easy for me to take the quilts down and put them up by myself. I can lengthen the chains to the last ring, put the new quilt on while standing on the floor, then get on a ladder and pull up each side to adjust. I'm not trying to manhandle an entire quilt by the rod and maneuver it on to a bracket, I'm just pulling up the chain and hooking it on the ceiling hook.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow! I'm impressed! One of my favorite hanging rods is a length of copper pipe with old glass doorknobs as finials. Easy peazy as they say. :)

      Delete